HOW TO PARALLEL SKIING A BEGINNERS GUIDE

Posted on

STEP 2: LEARN THE TERMINOLOGY

Before going further with more steps, familiarize yourself with these terms to help you understand how to parallel ski.

WORKING SKI

This ski is always in charge. It’s the boss. Some instructors will describe it as the outside or downhill ski, depending on the location in the turn.

RESTING SKI

This ski is the assistant. Some instructors describe the resting ski as the inside or uphill ski, depending on where you are in the turn.

BIG TOE EDGE

The working ski is always focused, pressured and tilted on big toe edge of the ski.

LITTLE TOE EDGE

The resting ski uses the little toe edge of the ski.

SKI SWAP

Between turns, the old working ski becomes the new resting ski and vice versa.

STEP 3: KEEP YOUR BRAIN IN YOUR BOOTS

Some instructors talk about moving to hips, knees or other body parts to execute parallel turns. For many learners, splitting focus between so many body parts creates confusion.

The easiest way to learn to parallel requires focusing only on the body parts inside your boots, namely, the shins, ankles, big and little toes. Your boots are the steering wheels for skiing.

Your focus needs to be on flexing the ankles, not the bending knees. When bending their knees, some people automatically stick their bums out. This puts weight on the heels instead of the balls of the feet.

Flexing the ankles instead results in slightly bent and relaxed knees which does not cause the bum to move. Keep your focus in your boots to help you learn to parallel quicker.

STEP 4: SHINS AND BOOTS SHOULD BE FRIENDS

For parallel skiing, your shins and boots should be friends. On the working ski, the shin bone should connect to the boot tongue. To be more precise, the side of the shin should press into the boot. The amount of pressure will vary based on your location in the turn.

Prev3 of 7Next

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *